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From 5 December 2023 to 7 January 2024

ADI Design Museum hosts the installation “Drive Different” by Giosuè Boetto Cohen. It is an exhibition window and collaboration on the exhibition “Drive different – From Austerity to the future of mobility” that the National Automobile Museum inaugurated in Turin on 23 November 2023 and will remain open until 7 April 2024.

In Milan, a reflection on the meaning of individual urban mobility is proposed: two iconic micro-cars of the past dialogue with their newly presented electric descendants.
Driving around the city on a very small vehicle with minimal consumption, occupying little space, and right to the door of the house is an old choice like the car. Even at the time of the pioneers there were miniature vehicles and even the first petrol car in history, the Patent-Motorwagen, was two and seventy meters long.

Today we look at micro-cars with different eyes, as one of the possible answers to the problem of urban mobility. An object almost tailor-made, for many but not for everyone, that organized and shared, can however turn into public service. At least where good alternatives do not exist.
The beautiful Isetta, a little snubbed by the Italians, a little sabotaged by Fiat, was welcomed by the Germans with a grateful soul and helped save the fates of BMW. Today it occupies a large room in the Museum of the House, in Monaco.
The 1936 Mickey Mouse arrived too early for people’s pockets and too late to escape the war. But beyond the Alps, where the market was ten times greater, the Simca brand immediately made it the first hatchback in France.

What links, then, the idea of Dante Giacosa to the Topolino Elettrica in 2023? And what brings the Isetta of seventy years ago to the newborn Microlino, which takes the lines so well? We ask this by looking at them together here, on a scenographic layout imagined by Giorgetto Giugiaro.

The world has changed. Melancholy is almost extinct. Big history is not, but in the dominant culture its weight is reduced. Instead, the desire to move in freedom, individual rather than collective remains strong: that pleasure that has made all cars the magical product of the ‘900. Freedom at all costs, environmental and portfolio, through generations, with a few exceptions for very young citizens, who look at the four wheels with a certain disenchantment. Moving “in freedom” even in the most complex, illogical, sometimes incompatible environment, which is urban space. At least as it has changed in the turn of the short century, and we are observing it in our time.”